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WINES BY REGION

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Morey St.-Denis

Whilst it would be wrong to suggest Morey St.-Denis is unknown amongst Burgundy-lovers, it certainly does not enjoy the same high profile as its neighbours Gevrey-Chambertin (to the north) and Chambolle-Musigny (to the south) to which it adjoins.  And given that it contains four grands crus - Clos de la Roche, Clos de Tart, Clos St.-Denis and Clos des Lambrays - of its own and that it shares a small portion (10%) of Bonnes-Mares it seems strange that Morey St.-Denis hasn't historically been higher on buyer's wishlists.morey-sign.jpg

At under 100 hectares of vineyards (but an impressive 40 ha of grands crus) Morey St.-Denis is smaller even than Chambolle-Musigny.  It was the last village to append the name of a vineyard to its name (in 1927) after much discussion as to the merits of it's best vineyards and indeed the grammatical feel of the proposed names. Interestingly, Gamay was a major grape variety in this commune until the turn of the 20th century.

The vineyards themselves have been subject to occasional reclassification - Clos de la Roche was originally 4.5 ha, subsequently absorbing numerous premiers crus vineyards it is today nearly 17 ha.  Even the grand cru Clos des Lambrays was only officially promoted to its current status in 1981.

It was said, even a decade ago, that Morey was the source of the best value red Burgundy.  Whilst this is no more true today than in any other major commune, as producers have upped their prices according to demand, there are numerous excellent vineyards and wines here, and are well worth seeking out.

The village of Morey St.-Denis is small, although there are several good hotels, but just one boulangerie and minimal dining options.  The grands crus sit in a contiguous strip at the top of the village along the Route des Grands Crus from Bonnes-Mares in Chambolle-Musigny to Latricieres-Chambertin in Gevrey-Chambertin, with just the premier cru 'Combottes' separating Clos de la Roche from Latricieres in an otherwise continuous two kilometer strip.